Why I’m Okay Knowing My Friends Don’t Read My Articles

It’s not for them anyways

Lindsey (Lazarte) Carson

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Photo by Devin Avery on Unsplash

I used to pass along nearly every rough draft of my articles to my family and friends so that they can read it all before I published or submitted them.

I figured if they liked it, then other people would like it too, right?

And I figured that they would give me their honest opinion because they wouldn’t be afraid to hurt my feelings since they’re close to me.

But, whenever I passed it onto them, then I’d have to wait for them to actually read it and give me their feedback which sometimes took a little longer than anticipated.

After all, they have lives too.

Lately, the volume at which I am producing content is far exceeding the rate in which they’re able to read everything in the time frame that I’m hoping for.

And then, I realized a few things about having your family and friends critique your work.

My friends are not my editors.

They don’t have to read, edit, and approve every single piece of content that I create.

They’re not on a strict work schedule to read my writing. I’m not paying them to do this.

Sure, I’ll still ask for their opinion on which headline sounds better every now and then, but they don’t need to read every single thing I write — That’s not their job.

They’re not entitled to deciding whether or not something I write gets published and they’re not the appropriate judges for deciding whether or not it’s actually good.

So, I stopped sending them my drafts.

And since then, I’ve felt a lot better about putting the accountability back in my own hands rather than waiting for them to tell me whether they liked it or not.

My friends are not my audience.

I’m not writing for my friends. They don’t have to be interested in everything I write about.

They’re not obligated to like, share, or clap for every single post.

Just the same as a tweet or a photo shared on Instagram, they’re not going to see and like…

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Lindsey (Lazarte) Carson

Writer, Runner, and New Mom. I write about work, relationships, culture, and life in general.